Grande-Bretagne

Success Story - Paul : Bringing good bread to Britain

Paul has raised the standard of bread in the Capital. Londoners have liked what they have tasted and bought it avidly. Now the French baker par excellence plans to expand nationwide.

Paul has raised the standard of bread in the Capital. Londoners have liked what they havetasted and bought it avidly. Now the French baker par excellence plans to expand nationwide.

It took more than a century before the French masterbakery PAUL plucked up the courage and crossedthe Channel. But for the citizens of London, the waitwas worth it. With 22 branches dotted around thecapital, PAUL is taking an ever larger slice of the highend bread market, and introducing a dash of Frenchpanache as well.
Pass beyond the familiar black-framed exterior ofany PAUL bakery and you soon learn that the term“chain” is a misnomer. Each one has its own distinctivedecoration and character. “You feel nice and cosy, likeyou are in Paris”, says Susanne Sauerland, the fi rm’sFinance Director.

Variety is the spice…
PAUL’s London shops range in size from the fl agshipemporium in Covent Garden, complete with waiterservice, to a cart that traverses Docklands’ Jubilee Place.Some are furiously busy, like the Canary Wharf branchwhich specialises in “sandwiches to go” for fi nancierson the hoof; others, like the bijou Hampstead PAUL,cater to leisurely passers-by browsing for the idealcake. The latest is in leafy Wimbledon.
Typically each PAUL branch offers a host of saladsand sandwiches, chocolate drenched crepes or desserts.Strawberry tartelettes (27,880 sold last year) jostle forprominence with fl utes (125,821), croissants (120,299)and cappuccinos (63,218).
Quality French wine accompanies meals in CoventGarden, while picnic hampers delight the takeawaycrowd. PAUL is keenly attuned to seasonal changestoo: in January, lighter foods to meet those NewYear’s resolutions; in February and March, indulgentValentines Day novelty patisseries or chocolate-coatedbrioche Easter Fish.

Using their loaf
But the basis remains bread itself, the stuff of life.“Bread is always our preference”, says Jessica Reichert,PAUL’s Business Development Manager, “because thatis where we came from”. Today fully 75% of BritishPAUL’s yearly turnover of £19 million comes from thesimple retail of bread. PAUL also employs a staff of380, three out of ten French, the rest from any one of50 nationalities, including a sizeable Polishcontingent.
Apart from shop staff, the central bakery in Actonemploys some 50 master bread bakers, specialist pastrychefs and van drivers – the arteries of the enterprise.Meanwhile unbranded PAUL loaves make their wayonto fi ve star hotel menus, and there are plans toventure beyond the current M25 envelope, to the North,Oxford, Guildford, Brighton, maybe even Edinburgh. [...]

Un article issu de INFO Magazine,
Mai 2010 / Juin 2010
une publication de la Chambre de commerce et d’industrie française en Grande Bretagne

Hannah Meloul, Editorial Assistant, INFO Magazine
Tel : +44 207 092 66 48
Site : www.ccfgb.co.uk  - @ : hmeloul(@)ccfgb.co.uk

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